1. Find a post

2. Add Who/What/When/Where/How

& Subtext

3. Write your story

About Alluding Misnomer

Alluding Misnomer
"When I began writing science fiction, when I began reading, heck, I wasn’t in any of this stuff I read. The only black people you found were occasional characters or characters who were so feeble-witted that they couldn’t manage anything, anyway. I wrote myself in, since I’m me and I’m here and I’m writing."
Octavia Butler to The New York Times, 2000
nevver:

How to Make Write
Our advice to every author that we ever talk to about anything
"All you can give us is what life is about from your point if view."
Anne Lamott, “Bird by Bird: Some Instructions on Writing and Life”
"First, find out what your hero wants, then just follow him!"
Ray Bradbury (via yeahwriters)
"When I write, I feel like an armless legless man with a crayon in his mouth."
Kurt Vonnegut
Enhance your creativity
A Tippi Hedren kinda day
"Respect your characters, even the ­minor ones. In art, as in life, everyone is the hero of their own particular story; it is worth thinking about what your minor characters’ stories are, even though they may intersect only slightly with your protagonist’s."

Sarah Waters (via amandaonwriting)

Good advice!

(via yeahwriters)

"A writer is a person who cares what words mean, what they say, how they say it. Writers know words are their way towards truth and freedom, and so they use them with care, with thought, with fear, with delight. By using words well they strengthen their souls. Story-tellers and poets spend their lives learning that skill and art of using words well. And their words make the souls of their readers stronger, brighter, deeper."
Ursula K. Le Guin (via quoteitout)
"Writing has nothing to do with publishing. Nothing. People get totally confused about that. You write because you have to - you write because you can’t not write. The rest is show-business. I can’t state that too strongly. Just write - worry about the rest of it later, if you worry at all. What matters is what happens to you while you’re writing the story, the poem, the play. The rest is show-business." — Peter S. Beagle